• Ariadne auf Naxos © Hans Jörg Michel
  • Ariadne auf Naxos © Florian Merdes
  • Ariadne auf Naxos © Florian Merdes
  • Ariadne auf Naxos © Florian Merdes
  • Ariadne auf Naxos © Florian Merdes
  • Ariadne auf Naxos © Hans Jörg Michel
  • Ariadne auf Naxos © Florian Merdes
  • Ariadne auf Naxos © Florian Merdes
  • Ariadne auf Naxos © Hans Jörg Michel
  • Ariadne auf Naxos © Florian Merdes
  • Ariadne auf Naxos © Florian Merdes
  • Ariadne auf Naxos © Florian Merdes
  • Ariadne auf Naxos © Florian Merdes
  • Ariadne auf Naxos © Florian Merdes

Richard Strauss

Ariadne auf Naxos

24. February 2019 - 02. June 2019

PROLOGUE

The opera ‘Ariadne auf Naxos’ has been composed for a special celebration which is about to begin. Both the composer and the singers are annoyed to find out that their performance will be followed by a comic play with songs. An argument develops between them and the company of actors led by the coquettish Zerbinetta.

This conflict threatens to escalate when it is announced at the last minute that both pieces are to be performed simultaneously. Zerbinetta finally rescues the situation by using her charms to mollify the composer and deciding that she and her company will improvise ways of taking part in the events of the opera.


OPERA

Ariadne, who has been left behind on the island of Naxos by her lover Theseus, is consumed with grief. Watched by three nymphs, she wishes for death. The four actors try to cheer her up by singing and dancing, but they fail to do so. Zerbinetta takes her aside and advises her to look for a new man as it is her belief that humans were not created to be monogamous. She herself decides to follow her own advice and chooses Harlequin from the men who are wooing her.

The nymphs announce the arrival of Bacchus, who has just narrowly escaped Circe’s clutches. Initially Ariadne thinks he is Hermes, the messenger of the Gods, bringing the death she has longed for. Eventually love is kindled between them, which releases Ariadne from her depression and seals Bacchus’s presence as both a man and a God. Zerbinetta comments ironically on this happiness: “Once a new God turns up, we are all speechless in our devotion.”
Kritik in der Rheinischen Post Düsseldorf auf www.rp-online.de

Kritik in der Rheinischen Post Duisburg auf www.rp-online.de

Kritik in der WAZ/NRZ unter www.derwesten.de

Radiobeitrag auf WDR 3, abrufbar unter www.wdrblog.de

Kritik im Online Musik Magazin auf www.omm.de

Kurzkritik auf IOCO unter www.ioco.de


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