7 Martin Schläpfer | Jackson Carroll, Paul Calderone, Alexandre Simões | © Gert Weigelt
b.17
7 (Uraufführung) / Martin Schläpfer
Opernhaus Düsseldorf
Thursday, 07. November 2013
19:30 - 21:00 hours

Dauer: ca. 1 ½ Stunden, keine Pause
16,80 - 75,10 € Abo.+15
Dauer: ca. 1 ½ Stunden, keine Pause
7 (Uraufführung)
Martin Schläpfer
Some decisions are taken spontaneously, but sometimes a choreographer can consider a composer and his score for years, living with it, listening to it over and over differently and with new ears, and sooner or later it arrives: the time for a new ballet has come. Martin Schläpfer discovered Mahler for himself early on, not only for hearing, but also for dancing, and Mahler proved a sort of framework of his dancing years: his first lead part came from Heinz Spoerli with the ballet “Wendung” (turning) to Mahler’s Rückert songs, and his farewell as a dancer was the Rudolf Nureyev part in Maurice Béjart’s “Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen”.

Many have chosen Mahler works as the music for their choreographies, but they seldom chose whole symphonies, as it would entail firstly taking up the challenge of their huge and monumental architectural magnitude, and secondly tackling the inexhaustible wealth of imagination and expressive character which can almost be said to speak out of the score to the point of physical gesture. Peak-storming pathos and world-lost raptness are just as much a part of Mahler as that deep inner distraction, unrest and fearfulness which show through the score of the Seventh Symphony also.

From the start Mahler’s works never lost hold of Martin Schläpfer: as freshly appointed Director of the Bern ballet the first of all his own choreographies in 1994 was a ballet on the Rückert songs, which the Press tore to pieces and led him to stop listening to Mahler. But two years ago in a radio broadcast he was struck with the 7th symphony, which is not played in the concert halls all that often: “I was deeply moved by the many-sided and flickering grandeur of the score”, confesses the choreographer, who over the years has formed his style more and more through increasing acquaintance with symphonic works. “A real Mahler and yet different from the Mahler of his other symphonies. The score has fantastic features, and yet it seems sterner and more aloof than his other works”. The same evening he decided to open the 2013/14 season with his version of the “Seventh” – in the knowledge that with his stage and costume designer Florian Etti for the forms and Axel Kober for the sounds he would be backed up by wonderful partners.
 
Some decisions are taken spontaneously, but sometimes a choreographer can consider a composer and his score for years, living with it, listening to it over and over differently and with new ears, and sooner or later it arrives: the time for a new ballet has come. Martin Schläpfer discovered Mahler for himself early on, not only for hearing, but also for dancing, and Mahler proved a sort of framework of his dancing years: his first lead part came from Heinz Spoerli with the ballet “Wendung” (turning) to Mahler’s Rückert songs, and his farewell as a dancer was the Rudolf Nureyev part in Maurice Béjart’s “Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen”.

Many have chosen Mahler works as the music for their choreographies, but they seldom chose whole symphonies, as it would entail firstly taking up the challenge of their huge and monumental architectural magnitude, and secondly tackling the inexhaustible wealth of imagination and expressive character which can almost be said to speak out of the score to the point of physical gesture. Peak-storming pathos and world-lost raptness are just as much a part of Mahler as that deep inner distraction, unrest and fearfulness which show through the score of the Seventh Symphony also.

From the start Mahler’s works never lost hold of Martin Schläpfer: as freshly appointed Director of the Bern ballet the first of all his own choreographies in 1994 was a ballet on the Rückert songs, which the Press tore to pieces and led him to stop listening to Mahler. But two years ago in a radio broadcast he was struck with the 7th symphony, which is not played in the concert halls all that often: “I was deeply moved by the many-sided and flickering grandeur of the score”, confesses the choreographer, who over the years has formed his style more and more through increasing acquaintance with symphonic works. “A real Mahler and yet different from the Mahler of his other symphonies. The score has fantastic features, and yet it seems sterner and more aloof than his other works”. The same evening he decided to open the 2013/14 season with his version of the “Seventh” – in the knowledge that with his stage and costume designer Florian Etti for the forms and Axel Kober for the sounds he would be backed up by wonderful partners.
 
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7 (Uraufführung)
Martin Schläpfer

MUSIC Symphony No.7 in E minor by Gustav Mahler
 
***
7 (Uraufführung)
Martin Schläpfer

MUSIC Symphony No.7 in E minor by Gustav Mahler
 

Choreographie Martin Schläpfer
Musikalische Leitung Axel Kober
Bühne und Kostüme Florian Etti
Licht Volker Weinhart
 
Tänzerinnen Sachika Abe, Ann-Kathrin Adam, Marlúcia do Amaral, Camille Andriot, Doris Becker, Wun Sze Chan, Sabrina Delafield, Mariana Dias, Feline van Dijken, Carolina Francisco Sorg, Nathalie Guth, Alexandra Inculet, Yuko Kato, So-Yeon Kim, Anne Marchand, Nicole Morel, Louisa Rachedi, Claudine Schoch, Virginia Segarra Vidal, Elisabeta Stanculescu, Julie Thirault, Anna Tsybina, Irene Vaqueiro
Tänzer Rashaen Arts, Christian Bloßfeld, Andriy Boyetskyy, Paul Calderone, Jackson Carroll, Martin Chaix, Michael Foster, Filipe Frederico, Philip Handschin, Richard Jones, Sonny Locsin, Alexander McKinnon, Marcos Menha, Bruno Narnhammer, Bogdan Nicula, Chidozie Nzerem, Alban Pinet, Friedrich Pohl, Boris Randzio, Alexandre Simões
Orchester Düsseldorfer Symphoniker
 

 

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